CATARACT  LENS  OPTIONS

After the cataract is removed, it is replaced with an artificial lens implant (IOL).

Choosing the right lens for you can be confusing. Understanding the various lens options is essential before making your lens choice.

Your eye health and prescription (including +/- astigmatism) plays an important part in determining which lens is the most appropriate for you to give you the best results.

THE PRIMARY DECISION IS THE TYPE OF VISION YOU WANT TO HAVE AFTER SURGERY

MONOFOCAL  LENS

GOOD DISTANCE VISION

will need reading glasses

GOOD READING VISION

will need distance glasses

MONOVISION

distance vision in one eye /

reading vision in the other eye

TORIC*

corrects astigmatism

MULTIFOCAL  LENS*

GOOD DISTANCE +

COMPUTER / INTERMEDIATE + 

READING VISION

= FULL range of vision
(minimal dependence on glasses)

TORIC*

corrects astigmatism

EXTENDED  FOCUS  LENS*

GOOD DISTANCE +

COMPUTER / INTERMEDIATE

VISION

  may need reading glasses for small print

TORIC*

corrects astigmatism

SEE FAR AWAY

with clear distance vision

SEE A SHOW

WATCH TV

DRIVE A CAR

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CATARACT

MONOFOCAL LENS

MULTIFOCAL LENS

EXTENDED FOCUS LENS

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SEE AT ARM'S LENGTH

with enhanced intermediate vision

USE A COMPUTER

READ A MENU

SEE THE DASHBOARD

SEE  UP  CLOSE

with everyday near vision

READ A BOOK

USE A CELL PHONE

SEWING, CRAFTS, GAMES

Dr. Gupta will discuss your options with you after a comprehensive evaluation. While there are a number of things to consider when choosing the most suitable lens, Dr. Gupta always takes the following things into account.

OVERALL HEALTH OF THE EYE

OUT OF POCKET COSTS 

SIGNIFICANT NIGHT-TIME DRIVING

Multifocal and extended focus lenses are generally not recommended for people with vision loss from macular degeneration, glaucoma, or other eye diseases. These IOLs allow less light into the eye so they can make things worse for people with vision loss. If avoiding glasses is important and you have eye damage, monovision may be a better option.

Multifocal, topic,and extended focus less are NOT covered by Medicare (including secondary / supplemental insurances and co-insurances) and commercial insurance plans.

If night driving is important, you might want to re-consider multifocal or extended focus lenses. Side effects such as glare, halos around lights or loss of contrast (resulting in dull vision) may occur with these lenses, most commonly at night or in dimly lit places. Fortunately, most people adapt to these effects to the point where it not bothersome.

*Extended, multifocal, and toric lens implants are NOT covered by Medicare and commercial insurance plans.

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LASER CATARACT SURGERY & ARTIFICIAL LENS OPTIONS

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© Alcon Vision, Inc.

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