STYE  &  CHALAZION

Styes are bumps that occur on the edge of the eyelids. Usually it is blocked oil gland (like a pimple) on your eyelid. Sometimes, however, it can be a bacterial infection that may require antibiotics. Styes and chalazions are very common and usually resolve with time and minor treatments.

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WHAT  ARE  THE  SYMPTOMS?

  • Bump, often painful, along the edge of the upper or lower eyelid near the base of the eyelashes

  • Swelling of the eyelid

  • Crusting along the eyelid

  • Sensitivity to bright light

  • Sore, scratchy eye

  • Tearing of the eye

  • A feeling that there is something in the eye

  • Usually your vision is unchanged, but occasionally it can feel blurry or as though you are looking through a film

WHAT  ARE  THE  RISK  FACTORS?

You may be prone to styes if you:

  • Have had a stye before

  • Have blepharitis (inflammation of the eyelids)

  • Have certain skin conditions, such as acne rosacea or seborrheic dermatitits

  • Have diabetes

  • Have dry skin

  • Are experiencing hormonal changes

  • Have high lipid levels (“bad” cholesterol)

WHAT  IS  THE  TREATMENT?

Most styes resolve on their own with self-care:

  • Warm compresses for 10-15minutes, 3-5x/day

  • Keep the eyelid/eyelash area clean with baby shampoo or eye lid wipes.

  • DO NOT: squeeze or pop a stye 

If you do not see some improvement in 48 hours, you may need additional treatment: 

  • Antibiotic/steroid ointment or eye drops

  • Occasionally, oral antibiotic pills

  • Steroid injection directly into the stye

  • Incision to drain the stye (done by an eyelid specialist)

For multiple or recurrent styes, consider TearCare®

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TEAR CARE®

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